A publication of the Department of English & Philosophy at Drexel University

Week of Writing 2011 Schedule

To see the 2011 Week of Writing Contest page, click here.


Overview | Location | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday


Overview

Monday, May 23rd

Marathon Reading

10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Behrakis Hall, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

The Future of the Graphic Novel

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

GRAPHIC NOVEL Writing Drop-in

5:00 pm – 6:00pm

Writing Center, MacAlister Lower Level

All-forms Creative Writing Drop-in

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Hagerty 222


Tuesday, May 24th

The Art of Advertising

11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Marathon Reading

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Young Adult Novel

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Young Adult Breakout Sessions

3:30 pm -5:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

FICTION Writing Drop-in

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

MacAlister5060


Wednesday, May 25th

PBQ’s Bookfair for Literacy

10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Great Court of Main Building

Speed Editing

12:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Main Auditorium

Meet the Editors Q & A

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

A.J. Drexel Picture Gallery

POETRY Writing Drop-in

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

MacAlister 5060


Thursday, May 26th

Saturnalia Books Reading

11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Making History

12:30 pm-1:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Marathon Reading

2:00 pm-2:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Travel Writing

3:00 pm-5:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Meet the Editors

5:15 pm-7:00 pm

Landmark


Friday, May 27th

Sketch Comedy Writing

11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Slam!

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm

Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Maya Open Mic

2:00 pm – 2:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

English Department Award Ceremony

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Behrakis Hall, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets


Location

All Week of Writing events will take place in the Creese Student Center, accessible via Chestnut Street entrances. Please check the individual events for details on which part of the Creese Student Center those events will take place within.

Campus Map


Monday, May 23rd

Reading Marathon

10:00 am – 2:00 pm

Behrakis Hall, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Student winners from the DPG and WoW contests, as well as faculty members deliver short readings of their own work.

The Future of the Graphic Novel

3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Bam! Pow! Experts from the world of comics will discuss the history of the graphic novel, its place in popular culture, and the opportunities and challenges presented by new media. With a panel comprised of an editor, writer, artist, and critic, the topic will be explored from all angles. What is possible in the graphic novel format, how do we measure its success, and where do we go from here? The panelists will give insight and advice based upon their own respective disciplines. Spandex outfits not required.

Panelist: John Arcudi has been telling lies since he was a very young boy. Eventually it became clear that this was the only thing he was really any good at, so a career in fiction seemed a good fit. After a stint writing some less than memorable work for Marvel, he ended up at Dark Horse where he wrote, among other things, several series of “The Mask” comic, co-creating material upon which a 1994 film and 1995 animated series were based. John has worked for every major comics company, but his name is perhaps best recognized as co-creator of the cult favorite “Major Bummer” series in 1997 and more recently the critically acclaimed graphic novel “A God Somewhere,” both for DC comics. He’s also pretty well known for collaborating with Mike Mignola and Guy Davis on a whole mess of BPRD comics.

Panelist: Tom Brennan, editor at Marvel Comics. Tom Brennan has worked for Marvel Entertainment for four years, and was recently promoted to the position of Associate Editor. He served as assistant editor for three years on the flagship Amazing Spider-Man title, and currently edits a number of books, notably Thunderbolts, Spider-Girl, and Venom. Before editing comics, he worked as a production assistant for CBS News. He also does freelance production work and performs improv and stand-up comedy in clubs and theaters around New York City. He graduated from Drexel University in Philadelphia, PA, in 2005 with a degree in Screenwriting & Playwriting.

Panelist: Peter T. Buckley, the editor-in-chief of MyLatestDistraction.com, a site that is dedicated to all forms of pop culture. Born and raised in Philadelphia, he has spent a lifetime collecting comic books (and watching professional wrestling) and now provides reviews, criticism, and commentary for new and longtime readers. Buckley received his undergraduate degree from Drexel, is a scientist by trade, and a fan by nature. He is also the founder of Break Even, an independent micro label releasing music from unknown artists.

Panelist: JG Jones has been making comics for nearly twenty years, working on books as varied as Shi, Black Widow, Marvel Boy, Wonder Woman, Wanted, and Final Crisis. A prolific painter and cover artist, JG has recently begun to tackle writing as well, beginning with a run on Doc Savage as he puts the finishing touches on the script for Dust To Dust, an original graphic novel.

Moderator: Don Haring, Jr. is a graduate of Drexel’s Graphic Design Program and has taught in the department for 12 years. Haring also works full-time as a storyboard artist and drew the boards for three commercials that aired during the 2011 Super Bowl broadcast. His comic strip “Dystopik Snomen” appeared in Drexel’s own Triangle newspaper in the early 1990s and went on to be published by alternative comics press Slave Labor Graphics. He now regrets the gross misspelling of both “dystopic” and “snowmen”.


Tuesday, May 24th

The Art of Advertising

11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

The images found in advertising, marketing, and branding convey and dictate much about what we think and feel about new products, services, trends, and fashions. Even more importantly, the success of an advertisement, as well as the method in which it is delivered to individuals, can often times impact the success of a particular product. In this panel, four well-known branding/marketing/advertising/merchandising professionals discuss advertising and promotions that have been done in the consumer market. Through a dedicated examination of the various methods of marketing used and product endorsements audience members will begin to understand why some products thrive and others are not so successful among consumers.

Panelist: Natalie Nixon Ph.D., Associate Professor and Director of Fashion Industry Management Program at Philadelphia University. Natalie has worked in the fashion industry as an entrepreneurial and in apparel sourcing for The Limited Brands in Sri Lanka and Portugal. Her research and consulting interests are in integrative strategic design, experiential service design, and applying elements from the fashion and style realms to a range of sectors in order to build brand distinction.

Panelist: Sara Rodowich, Regional Director, The Fashion Group International – Philadelphia. Sarah’s professional experience includes nearly five years as Public Relations Manager for Bloomingdale’s Philadelphia market, handling special events, community/philanthropic outreach, and media relations. Prior to Bloomingdales, Sarah worked as a Special Events Manager at Fashion Group International (FGI) in NYC.

Panelist: Elizabeth Hanson, Director of Marketing Communications, Goodwin College at Drexel University. Elizabeth has been working in higher education marketing for the past 25 years. Prior to that, she worked as an advertising copywriter for several local ad agencies and in sales promotion for Philadelphia Magazine. She has a bachelor’s degree in Communications from Temple University, an MBA from Widener University, and is currently earning a Certificate in Retail Leadership through the Goodwin College and Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design.

Moderator: Joseph H. Hancock, II, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Fashion Design and Design & Merchandising at Drexel Univeristy. Joe teaches and conducts research in the areas of fashion branding, contemporary mass fashion, sex, gender, and popular culture. He has a twenty-year merchandising and management background having worked for big names in industry such as Gap Inc., Limited Brands, Inc., and the Target Corporation. He is author of the international Condé Nast/Fairchild Publications textbook Brand/Story: Ralph, Vera, Johnny, Billy, and Other Adventures in Fashion Branding.

Marathon Reading

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Student winners from the DPG and WoW contests, as well as faculty members deliver short readings of their own work.

Young Adult Novel

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Authors of YA fiction and experts in the genre will speak about the challenges and rewards they find in YA literature. The panelist authors’ 2010 publications range from historical fiction to realist comedy to the re-imagining and modernization of classic literature. These guests will speak on what is at stake in current trends in Young Adult Fiction as well as how and why they write. Experienced educators will discuss the impact YA fiction can have on student populations.

Panelist: Josh Berk is the author of The Dark Days of Hamburger Halpin (Knopf 2010), and a second comedy/mystery teen novel coming from Knopf in 2012. He has previously been a journalist, a poet, a playwright, and a guitarist (mostly in bands known for things other than fine guitar-playing). He is a librarian and lives in a cornfield in Allentown, Pennsylvania, with his family.

Panelist: April Lindner is an Associate Professor of English at Saint Joseph’s University. Her poetry collection, Skin, received the Walt McDonald First-Book Prize in Poetry, and her poems have been featured in many anthologies and textbooks. The mother of two teenage boys, she plays acoustic guitar badly, sees more rock concerts than she’d care to admit, and travels whenever she can. Jane (Poppy 2010) is her debut novel; a re-imagining of Wuthering Heights is due out next.

Panelist: Cheryl McFadden, from the Office of Secondary School Reform is a graduate of Philadelphia High School for Girls, Temple University and Arcadia University. She joined the School District of Philadelphia after a combined twenty years of working in the corporate and public service. Since coming to the school district she worked for five years at Roberts Vaux High School as a classroom teacher. During her tenure at Vaux, she spearheaded several programs for students, including Prime Movers Journalism program (a partnership with The Washington Post and Knights Foundation), “Breakfast with the Brothers,” a mentoring program other high schools have emulated. For the past two years she has worked in the capacity of developing instructional programs for high schools that focus on creating gender equity and equality. She has presented at the WE LEARN women’s conference on Literacy and has conducted numerous educational workshops with a special emphasis focused on meeting the needs of African American males.

Panelist: Dianne Salerni, author of We Hear the Dead (Sourcebooks Fire 2010), holds degrees from the University of Delaware and University of Pennsylvania. She has taught elementary school for over twenty years, often sharing writing with her students. She writes horror and fantasy as well as historical fiction, with short stories published in several volumes of Visions, a ongoing collection of pulp fiction (Strider Nolan Media). We Hear the Dead has been optioned by Open Eye Studio.

Moderator: Julie Davis, Library Media Specialist, University City High School Promise Academy. She is originally from Bucks County and has been a school librarian for 12 years. She has a Masters in Education with Library concentration from Arcadia University. Her favorite genre is historical fiction.

Young Adult Breakout Session

3:30 pm-5:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

The authors, Drexel faculty, and experienced students will lead break-out sessions of small groups to participate in some on-the-spot writing so that students can practice and discuss writing YA literature themselves. Break-out groups will focus on various elements of the writing process, such as creating settings, capturing dialogue, giving characters personality and depth, maintaining action and forward narrative momentum, and adding intellectual/emotional complexity to the work as a whole.


Wednesday, May 25th

PBQ Bookfair for Literacy

10:00 am – 3:00 pm

Great Court of Main Building

This event will bring together regional small presses, academic publishers, and literary magazines. The Bookfair aims to help fight illiteracy and support PBQ’s efforts to acknowledge the importance of the written word in the digital age. Used books are sold with all proceeds donated to Philadelphia Reads, a local literacy group that is dedicated to eradicating children’s illiteracy in Philadelphia. The additional books will be donated to Books Through Bars, an NPO that serves the incarcerated and their families.

Poets Wear Prada- Roxanne Hoffman

Philadelphia Poets- Rosemary Cappello

Hidden River Publishing/New Door Books-Debra Leigh Scott

American Poetry Review-David Bonanno

Philadelphia Stories-Carla Spataro

Ringtail Cafe-Darren Mueller

Aviary- Lillian Dunn

Barrelhouse- Tom MacAlister
Drexel-PBQ/DPG/Saturnalia

Speed Editing

12:00 – 1:30 pm

Main Auditorium

Editors from various fields and disciplines, such as journalism, creative, and academic writing, will offer attendees advise on their own work, in 5-minute “speed” sessions.

Meet the Editors Q&A

3:30 pm – 5:00 pm

A.J. Drexel Picture Gallery

Editors from various fields and disciplines will discuss the “behind-the-scenes” work that goes into their craft, and will answer questions on all topics related to the publishing industry.


Thursday, May 26th

Saturnalia Books Reading, sponsored by the Certificate in Writing and Publishing

11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Poets Martha Silano and Dorothea Lasky

Martha Silano is the author of The Little Office of the Immaculate Conception (Saturnalia Books, 2011), winner of the Saturnalia Books Poetry Prize 2010 selected by Campbell McGrath, as well as two previous collections, Blue Positive (Steel the Books, 2006), and What the Truth Tastes Like (Nightshade, 1999). Her poems appear in journals including AGNI, American Poetry Review, Beloit Poetry Journal, TriQuarterly, and over a dozen anthologies, including Starting Today: 100 Poems for Obama’s First 100 Days and The Best American Poetry 2009.

Dorothea Lasky is the author of Black Life and AWE, both out from Wave Books. Her work appears in Gurlesque: the new grrly, grotesque, burlesque poetics (Saturnalia Books, 2010). She is also the author of several chapbooks, including Poetry is Not a Project (Ugly Ducking Presse, 2010). She currently lives in New York City and can be found online at www.birdinsnow.com.

Making History

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Panelists will be writers of historical fiction, popular history, and academic history, and will discuss the challenges involved in manipulating historical events and characters in the writing they do. Panelists will discuss background research, the difficulties of achieving realistic atmosphere and (in some cases) dialogue, and the problems attached to recreating the past when resources are limited or contradictory.

Panelist: H.G. “Buzz” Bissinger is among the nation’s most honored and distinguished writers. A native of New York City, Buzz is the winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the Livingston Award, the American Bar Association Silver Gavel Award and the National Headliners Award, among others. He also was a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. He is the author of three highly acclaimed nonfiction books: Friday Night Lights, A Prayer for the City, and Three Nights in August.

Panelist: Paula Marantz Cohen, Distinguished Professor of English at Drexel University, holds a B. A. in French and English from Yale College and a Ph.D. in English Literature from Columbia University. She is the author of four nonfiction books and four novels, including her latest, the historical thriller, What Alice Knew: A Most Curious Tale of Henry James and Jack the Ripper. She is regular reviewer for the Times Literary Supplement and The Philadelphia Inquirer, a co-editor of jml: Journal of Modern Literature, and a host of “The Drexel InterView,” a TV talk show out of Philadelphia, broadcast on over 300 public television and university-affiliated stations throughout the country.

Panelist: Jay Kirk’s new book, Kingdom Under Glass, is a sweeping historical narrative of the life of Carl Akeley, the famed explorer and taxidermist. Kirk’s non-fiction has been published in Harper’s, GQ, The New York Times Magazine, and The Nation. His work has been anthologized in Best American Crime Writing 2003 and 2004, and Best American Travel Writing 2009 (edited by Simon Winchester). He is a recipient of a 2005 Pew Fellowship in the Arts and is a MacDowell Fellow. He teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Pennsylvania.

Panelist: Nathaniel Popkin writes about the American urban experience and is the author of Song of the City: An Intimate History of the American Urban Landscape (Four Walls Eight Windows) and The Possible City: Exercises in Dreaming Philadelphia (Camino Books). Popkin is currently the senior writer for the documentary film series “Philadelphia: The Great Experiment” and the editor of Hidden City, Dreams Revealed, a prospective work to be published by Paul Dry Books about the experience and impact of the Hidden City festival. He is currently at work on I Will Flood You, a novel about the tragic death of the painter John Lewis Krimmel.

Moderator: Scott Knowles, Assistant Professor & Director of Great Works Symposium and author of Imagining Philadelphia: Edmund Bacon and the Future of the City (UPenn Press, 2009), and Experts in Disaster: A History of Risk and Authority in the Modern United States (UPenn Press, forthcoming 2011).

Marathon Reading

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Student winners from the DPG and WoW contests, as well as faculty members deliver short readings of their own work.

Travel Writing

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Four prominent travel writers discuss the genre, their own work, and what it means to be a travel writer in the 21st century.

Tony Perrottet is an Australian-born travel writer living in New York City. A former foreign correspondent in South America, he is as a regular contributor to the The Smart Set, New York Times, Smithsonian Magazine, Condé Nast Traveler, Slate, and other publications, and is the author of five books, including Off the Deep End, Pagan Holiday, The Naked Olympics, and Napoleon’s Privates. His work has been translated into eight languages and has appeared in the Best American Travel Writing series four times. His new book on salacious historical secrets, The Sinner’s Grand Tour: A Journey Through the Historical Underbelly of Europe is being published by Broadway Books in May, 2011. His website is www.tonyperrottet.com

David Farley is the author of the award-winning travel memoir/narrative history An Irreverent Curiosity: In Search of the Strangest Relic in Italy’s Oddest Town (Penguin, 2009) and co-editor of the anthology of travel essays Travelers’ Tales Prague and the Czech Republic: True Stories (Travelers’ Tales, 2006). He’s a Contributing Editor at Afarmagazine and also writes regularly for the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Smart Set, Slate, and WorldHum. He teaches travel writing at New York University.

Andrew McCarthy is a two-time Lowell Thomas Award winner, including being named the SATW Foundation 2010 Travel Journalist of the Year. He has twice been cited for “notable” work in the Best American Travel series, and is a contributing editor at National Geographic Traveler. His travel writing has also appeared in Travel+Leisure, Afar, Men’s Journal, Islands, National Geographic Adventure, and The Atlantic. Before travel writing, Andrew was best known for his starring roles in such films as Pretty in Pink, St. Elmo’s Fire, Less Than Zero, and Weekend at Bernie’s. His website is http://www.andrewmccarthy.com

Jason Wilson is the editor of The Smart Set at Drexel University, the series editor of The Best American Travel Writing anthology, and the author of Boozehound: On the Trail of the Rare, the Obscure, and the Overrated in Spirits (Ten Speed, 2010). He is the spirits columnist for the Washington Post and the beer columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle, and he has written for National Geographic Traveler, Travel & Leisure, and Conde Nast Traveler, among many other newspapers and magazines. He teaches writing courses in Drexel University’s Honors College. His website is www.jasonwilson.com

Meet the Editors

5:15 pm – 7:00 pm

Landmark

Painted Bride Quarterly and The Smart Set would like to invite faculty and students to meet the editors of our many and varied publications at Drexel, such as: ASK; Drexel Publishing Group Online magazine; Journal of the African Literature Association (JALA); Journal of Modern Literature; Per Contra; Press One; Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature; Saturnalia Books; the Sonia Sanchez Literary Review; When Falls the Coliseum, and others.
Please join us for cocktails and conversation at the new Landmark Americana. Cocktail buffet; Sangria, beer and wine served to those over 21.


Friday, May 27th

Sketch Comedy Writing

11:00 am – 12:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

The WaitStaff Dishes About Sketch Comedy: This panel is comprised of writer/actors from Philadelphia’s premier sketch comedy troupe, The WaitStaff. This lively discussion will focus on the group’s history as it relates to collaborative writing, improvisation, character development, and the rehearsal process. Participants will explore questions which include but are not limited to: What’s the difference between live sketch comedy and improv? How does live sketch comedy compare/contrast to other forms of comedic writing? Who are The Real Housewives of South Philly?
The WaitStaff has become a mainstay of the Philadelphia comedy scene since its inception in 2003. The troupe has performed for packed houses in New York, Chicago and Washington DC. They have been called “One of the funniest groups of people to hit the Philly Stages” (The Philadelphia Daily News), “Philadelphia’s hottest sketch-comedy troupe” (The Philadelphia Inquirer), and “The sort of comedy that kids love, parents disapprove of, and adults find irresistibly hilarious even while shaking their heads” (The Main Line Times). The WaitStaff has been featured on Comedy Central’s website, Funnyordie.com and profiled in an episode of Experience, a program produced by the Arts and Culture Service of WHYY TV. The Waitstaff will be performing at Helium Comedy Club on Wednesday June 1, 2011. More info: www.thewaitstaff.com

Slam!

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm

Behrakis Hall, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

At the stairs in front of Behrakis, students will participate in an interactive improve writing experience which they full control: students provide the topics, write for five minutes, share their work, and the audience decides who wins by their own applause (and hooting and hollering). Dollar store prizes abound.

Maya Open Mic

2:00 pm – 2:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

Maya, Drexel’s own undergraduate literary magazine, continues the reading series in the Mandell Theater Lobby. This event, however, is hosted by you. All Drexel students are invited to participate by sharing their work. Reading slots tend to fill up quickly, so please email dsomaya@drexel.edu if you are interested in reading.

English Department Award Ceremony

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Behrakis Hall, Creese Student Center, 33rd and Chestnut Streets

This ceremony features the 30th Annual Freshman Writing Awards, the Literature Essay Prize, the Week of Writing (WoW) Awards, and the Sigma Tau Delta Inductions. The awards are sponsored by the Erika Guenther and Gertrud Daemmrich Memorial Prizes, The Department of English and Philosophy, and the College of Arts and Sciences. Refreshments will be served.