A publication of the Department of English & Philosophy at Drexel University

2014 Week of Writing Schedule

To see the 2014 Week of Writing Contest page, click here.


Overview | Campus Map | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday


Overview

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Writing is what keeps us connected, whether it’s through papers, text messages, presentations, tweets, or status updates. It doesn’t matter if the writing is creative or informative; we use writing to connect with others. Writing helps us reach a breadth of readers, from those both in and outside of our fields, to anyone else who is willing to read. Drexel celebrates writing every spring by holding the Week of Writing, when disciplines from across the University collaborate to celebrate and present different styles of writing. This year, Drexel Publishing Group invites you to join us during WoW with faculty and student readings, workshops, story slams, and discussions about writing. All events are free and do not require preregistration.


Campus Map

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Monday, May 12th

Marathon Reading

11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore


Tuesday, May 13th

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Write Like Crazy

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Black Sheep Reading

7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Location: Black Sheep Pub (247 S. 17th St.)


Wednesday, May 14th

Mentoring Young Writers in Philadelphia

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Writing Lyrics: Survivors’ Guide

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Location: URBN 128 (1st floor of the URBN Center, Market Street level)

I’ll Have The Footlong, Hold The Smut: Writing About Sex

3:00 pm- 4:20 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore


Thursday, May 15th

Write on the Side

9:30 am – 10:50 am

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Urban Poetry from Saturnalia Poets

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Storytelling in Unexpected Places

3:30 pm – 4:50 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore


Friday, May 16th

Slam Bam Thank You Ma’am!

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Painted Bride Quarterly’s own interactive writing competition!

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Co-op and Internship Opportunities in Writing and Editing

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Maya Reading

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

English Department Awards Ceremony

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Location: PISB 106 and the Atrium


MORE DETAILS COMING! STAY TUNED!



Monday, May 12th

Marathon Reading

11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Student winners of the WoW Writing Contest, as well as faculty members, read from their own original creative writing. Each reading is followed by questions and comments from the audience as the writers talk about the inspiration and decisions that made the pieces possible.


Tuesday, May 13th

Marathon Reading 

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Student winners of the WoW Writing Contest, as well as faculty members, read from their own original creative writing. Each reading is followed by questions and comments from the audience as the writers talk about the inspiration and decisions that made the pieces possible.

 

Write Like Crazy

2:00 pm: 3:20 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Writers addressing mental illness work in a crucial moment in American medical, social, and cultural history. The painful stigma of mental illness continues to thrive in our culture, yet openness about mental health treatment, sensitivity to those grappling with mental illness, and progressive treatment for a range of conditions has never been stronger. Writers who choose to explore mental illness as a topic place themselves into this charged space. This panel will ask three writers who have addressed mental illness to discuss the choices they face as writers and the consequences of those choices—consequences that affect themselves, readers, culture, and society.

Panel Participants:

One of Narrative’s Best New Writers, Evan Roskos’s fiction has appeared in Granta’s New Voices online feature, as well as in Story Quarterly, The Hummingbird Review, and BestFiction. He earned an MFA from Rutgers University — Newark and teaches literature and writing courses for Rowan University and Rutgers University — Camden. His debut novel Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) was published in March 2013 and was optioned by Kreate Films producer Shona Tuckman. Evan lives in NJ with his wife and son.

Philadelphia journalist Liz Spikol wrote The Trouble With Spikol, a first-person newspaper column and blog on the subject of mental health, for 10 years. She also covered general interest behavioral health issues for a variety of publications. Her writing gleaned numerous awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Pennsylvania Newspaper Association, as well as from the National Mental Health Association and the Philadelphia Psychiatric Society. She received an Access Achievement Award from the Philadelphia Mayor’s Commission on People With Disabilities for her efforts to destigmatize mental illness, and has been interviewed on that subject on a number of programs on National Public Radio as well as in the New York Times. She is currently featured in the award-winning documentary Of Two Minds about bipolar disorder. After several gigs working with people who have chronic behavioral health issues and homelessness, she now works as an editor at Philadelphia Magazine.

Moderator:

Jennifer Schwartz, PhD, is an Associate Teaching Professor and Director of the Drexel Psychological Services Center (PSC) in the Department of Psychology. At the PSC, graduate students in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program at Drexel are trained in state-of-the-art therapeutic approaches of client assessment and treatment. Schwartz trains cognitive-behavioral intervention techniques and utilizes a competency-based model to foster student development as research-informed clinicians. Schwartz embraces emerging technologies as tools for enhancing client care and facilitating training of graduate students. Additionally, she also enjoys working with undergraduate students and exciting them about the field of psychology.

 

PBQ’s Black Sheep Reading Series 

7:30 pm – 10:00 pm

Location: Black Sheep Pub (247 S. 17th St.)

On Tuesday May 13, come celebrate Leprechaun Day with PBQ’s at the Black Sheep Pub (247 S. 17th St.) at 7:30 p.m. for an exciting reading with acclaimed poets Kelly McQuain and Teresa Leo. Kelly and Teresa are long-time PBQ friends, authors, and editors. Follow us to the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow where there’s no cover charge, plenty of drinks, mouth-watering food specials, and Irish hospitality all year.

Kelly McQuain grew up in the mountains of West Virginia. He holds graduate degrees from the University of New Orleans and Temple University. His recent book, Velvet Rodeo, is the winner of the Bloom Chapbook Prize and his poems have appeared recently in The Pinch, Painted Bride Quarterly, Assaracus, Redivider, MEAD, Paper Nautilus, and Kestrel, as well as in such anthologies as Between: New Gay Poetry and Drawn to Marvel: Superhero Poems. He also writes prose, essays, and book reviews. He occasionally designs book covers, illustrates comics, or draws for the sheer pleasure of it.www.KellyMcQuain.wordpress.com

Teresa Leo is the author of two books of poetry, Bloom in Reverse  (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014) and The Halo Rule(Elixir Press, 2008), winner of the Elixir Press Editors’ Prize. Her work has appeared  in the American Poetry Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, Women’s Review of Books, New Orleans Review, Barrow Street, the Florida Review, Cleaver Magazine, Painted Bride Quarterly, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of a Pew fellowship, a Leeway Foundation grant, two Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowships, and the Richard Peterson Poetry Prize from Crab Orchard Review. She works at the University of Pennsylvania. http://www.teresaleo.com

Questions? Email pbq@drexel.edu

Join the Facebook event!


Wednesday, May 14th

Untold Stories Inside Us: Mentoring Young Writers in Philadelphia

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

We write in order to think.  However, there is a literacy crisis in Philadelphia—where over 40% of public high school students drop out and half of all working-age adults are functionally illiterate. Literacy issues undermine the ability of many children and young adults to experiment with self-expression and develop critical thinking skills.  In this panel, representatives of local efforts to support kids’ writing—Mighty Writers and Philadelphia Stories Jr.—will showcase their organizations’ programs to get kids to experience writing as a source of pleasure as well as of empowerment.

Panel Participants:

Annette John-Hall.  Program director at MW West, Annette John-Hall was an award-winning columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer from 2007 to 2013 and one of 20 African-American columnists invited to the White House for an interview with President Obama. John-Hall previously covered sports at the San Jose Mercury News, the Rocky Mountain News in Denver and the Oakland Tribune. She has led a popular sportswriting workshop at Mighty Writers since 2009.

Rachel Loeper.  Mighty Writers’ interim development director, Rachel Loeper has taught creative writing, English as a second language and early literacy. She received her BA in Eglish Literature from Goucher College and her MFA in creative writing from Hollins University, where she received a fellowship to teach fiction and poetry.  Most recently, she served as director of a remedial literacy program at Universal Institute Charter School.

Tara Smith is a professional editor, an MFA candidate at Rosemont College, and Program Director for PS Books. She is on the editorial board for Philadelphia Stories Jr. and runs a writing group for kids in Kennett Square as well.

Moderator:

Deirdre McMahon, Department of English and Philosophy at Drexel University, teaches writing, British literature, postcolonial literature and young adult fiction.  She studied at Swarthmore College, the University of Virginia and the University of Iowa, where she earned her Ph.D. in Nineteenth-Century British Literature.

Writing Lyrics: Survivors’ Guide 

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Location: URBN 128 (1st floor of the URBN Center, Market Street level)

A big challenge in songwriting is crafting compelling lyrics that aren’t cheesy or cliche. The panelists will discuss their approaches and what makes lyrics memorable and successful within the confines of the pop song format.

Panel Participants:

After graduating in 1996 from the Ecole Superieure de Realisation Audiovisuelle (Paris, France), Cyrille Taillandier started his professional career as an assistant recording engineer. From 1996 to 1999 he worked at a number of prominent French studios including Davout, Soft-ADS, Miraval, and Le Manoir. As a second engineer for the recording of the multi-platinum and award winning *Essence Ordinaire* by the renowned French band Zebda, Cyrille worked side by side with the album’s producer Nicholas Sansano and traveled to New York for the completion of the record. He fell in love with the city and moved to Brooklyn in 1999. For the next two years Cyrille worked as a Pro Tools engineer and mix assistant with Tony Maserati on multi-platinum albums including Alicia Keys’ *Songs in A Minor*, P. Diddy’s *Forever*, R. Kelly’s *TP-2.com*, and Jennifer Lopez’s *On the 6*. Cyrille has been an independent audio and Pro Tools engineer since 2001. In 2006 he began teaching at the Clive Davis Department of Recorded Music, Tisch School of the Arts, NYU. Cyrille joined AWCoMAD’s Music Industry Program in 2007. His recent credits include Lenny Kravitz’s *It is Time for a Love Revolution*and Angelique Kidjo’s *OYO*.

John Faye has been writing songs professionally since his first band, The Caulfields, inked a major-label recording contract with A&M Records in 1994. A publishing deal with Warner-Chappell Music followed in 1995. Since then, Faye has seen just about every side of the music business, scoring song placements in film and television, garnering radio airplay, and touring the US, Canada, and Australia. Faye’s current band, IKE, recently had a Philly radio and sports arena hit with their song Into Philadelphia and opened for Bon Jovi at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City. Faye has also been teaching songwriting at Drexel since 2005. In addition to performing full-band shows with IKE, John Faye plays 50+ solo shows a year, showcasing his top-shelf originals in their most personal, bare-essentials form. One listen is all it takes to see why Faye, as a solo performer, has been invited to share stages with artists such as Butch Walker, Joan Osbourne, Jesse Malin, Freedy Johnston, America, and Colin Hay (Men At Work). http://ikeonline.net/

A Philadelphia native, Lucy Stone, a 20 year-old songstress, has already dedicated herself to more projects than a person has fingers. Lucy has opened for national acts such as The Dirty Projectors, Cymbals Eat Guitars, B.o.B and Major Lazer. Most recently the young college student has just finished working with multi-platinum recording artist Rusted Root on their new album entitled “The Movement”.

Transitioning from a multi-band repertoire to her newly formed solo project, Lucy released her first EP, “Would You?” in late April. Showcasing a unique lyrical style, the songs are intricately crafted, and were recorded in West Philadelphia with her band consisting of Brandon Bost, Sean Donaghy, Isaac Louis and Paul Impellizeri. With a variety of folk-inspired harmonies and re-vamped vintage guitar tones, the bass and drums drive the arrangements, tastefully borrowing a 60’s pop sensibility that defines the blues-based indie-pop band. https://lucystone.bandpage.com//

I’ll Have The Footlong, Hold the Smut: Writing About Sex

3:00 pm – 4:20 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

For as tricky as sex can be in real life, it can even more…awkward…on the page. How does a literary writer portray the erotic without writing erotica? Overly clinical description can be just as rough (pardon me) on the eye and ear as overly wrought metaphor. Our panel will give us advice on how NOT to write 50 Shades of Grey (buckets of money be damned)!

Panel Participants:

Ras Mashramani lives in both the dwindling memory of dial-up and West Philadelphia. She writes about internet growing pains, shame, sex, and alien insemination. She is a founding member of Metropolarity, a sci-fi arts collective dedicated to emancipatory speculation and storytelling. She is also currently helping to curate the sci-fi track [[Liberation Technologies: World-building for Survival in the Post-Apocalypse]] for Detroit’s Allied Media Conference. Her first zine, PROLOGUE, will soon be available for purchase at metropolarity.storenvy.com.

Her work can be found in Bedfellows Magazine, APIARY Magazine, >kill author, Pangur Ban Party, The Painted Bride Quarterly, and Metropolarity’s Journal of Speculative Vision. Find out more at rasmashramani.tumblr.com.

Lisa Zeidner has published five novels, most recently the critically acclaimed Love Bomb, and two books of poems. Her stories, reviews, and essays have appeared in The New York TimesSlateGQTin House, and elsewhere. She is a Professor at Rutgers University in Camden, New Jersey, where she teaches the MFA Program in Creative Writing. She lives with her husband, John Lafont, and greyhounds Trish and Zelda in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

Moderator:

Anthony DeCurtis is a contributing editor for Rolling Stone and a distinguished lecturer in the creative writing program at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the co-author with Clive Davis of Davis’s autobiography, The Soundtrack of My Life, a New York Times best seller. His essay accompanying the Eric Clapton box set “Crossroads” won a Grammy Award in the “Best Album Notes” category, and he holds a PhD in American literature from Indiana University. He is currently working on a biography of Lou Reed. 


Thursday, May 15th

Write on the Side

9:30 am – 10:50 am

Location: Drexel Bookstore

This panel brings together writers  who  participate professionally both  in the  the world of science and medicine and  the world of imaginative writing . Our panelists include  three physicians and a mathematician who will speak on  what drew them to their “day jobs” and what compelled them to engage in other  types of “writing on the side.”

Panel Participants:

Dr. Salman Akhtar is a Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at Jefferson Medical College and is the author of several volumes of poetry.

Dr. John Clarke is a professor in the Department of Surgery and has  spent 31 years as a trauma surgeon, emergency and acute care physician. He has a special interest in tracking medical errors and has been a consultant for various medical institutions in this endeavor. More recently, he has focused much of his attention to  writing science fiction for children.

Dr. Marion Cohen currently teaches mathematics at Arcadia University and has previously taught in the Department of Mathematics at  our own Drexel University as wells in other institutions. She has published many collections of poetry and two memoirs focusing on her experiences  as the wife/caregiver of her first husband, who contracted a severe form of MS in his thirties and died two decades later.

Dr. Paul A. Offit is the Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and the Director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.  He is also the author of  several non fiction texts on the history of the vaccine and on recent misinterpretations of the critical value of vaccines in in medical care.

Urban Poetry from Saturnalia Books 

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Join Saturnalia Books for an intimate reading by three unique and exciting poets exploring the subgenre of urban poetry.

Panel Participants:

Sarah Blake is the author of Mr. West, an unauthorized lyric biography of Kanye West, forthcoming from Wesleyan University Press in Spring 2015. Her poems have appeared in Boston Review, The Threepenny Review, and elsewhere. She was awarded an NEA fellowship for poetry in 2013. She’s Assistant Editor at Saturnalia Books and co-founder of Submittrs.

Jason Zuzga is completing a PhD at University of Pennsylvania on media and ecology. He is the Other/Nonfiction editor of FENCE. His poetry can be found in publications such as The Yale Review, The Paris Review, Tin House, and Nerve.com. His first full-length book of poetry will be published by Saturnalia Books in 2016.

Sebastian Agudelo’s first book, To the Bone, won the 2008 Saturnalia Books Poetry Prize selected by Mark Doty. His second collection, Each Chartered Street, poems about urban Philadelphia, was released in 2013. His poetry has appeared in American Poetry Review, Antioch Review, Manchester Review, and elsewhere.

 

Storytelling in Unexpected Places

3:30 – 4:50 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Using storytelling in writing, painting, music, dance, or film seems like a natural combination. People expect the art of storytelling to work with other arts. How then do we explain storytelling’s presence in the professional world? Can storytelling be useful in the lab? The corporation? The government? Elsewhere? This multi-media presentation and panel discussion will bring together several professionals from various occupations to discuss the role of storytelling in places where we wouldn’t expect it.

Panel Participants:

Dan Arp conducts public diplomacy and outreach for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of International Labor Affairs, the lead U.S agency responsible for protecting the rights of workers worldwide. Here he puts a human face on the Bureau’s work, collecting stories from the field to raise awareness of child labor, forced labor, and other violations of human rights. Before earning his Masters of Science in Foreign Service from Georgetown University, he taught fiction writing at the Pittsburgh High School for the Creative and Performing Arts, where he also earned his BA in Creative Writing from Carnegie Mellon University.

Ben Warfield balances his time between crafting, recording and performing music for films, galleries and video games while contributing to the scientific research and operations of the Light Research Program of Thomas Jefferson University. Through music, he works with Data Garden, The Ruins of Friendship Orchestra, filmmaker David Kessler, and filmmaker Zach Weddington. At the neuroscience laboratory, with grants through NIH, NCI, NASA, NSBRI, DOE and companies including Philips, Panasonic and OSRAM, he has worked on several projects, including nighttime light exposure and cancer, Seasonal Affective Disorder, and developing lighting environments for the International Space Station.

Pam Grossman, in her capacity as Getty Images’ Director of Visual Trends, has presented research on commercial imagery at various Fortune 500 companies and conferences, including Sheryl Sandberg’s LeanIn.Org female empowerment nonprofit, Google’s in-house global creative team, Microsoft and others. She and her work with Getty Images and LeanIn.Org have been featured in The New York Times, AdAge, Wired, Buzzfeed, Washington Post, The Seattle Times, Mashable, Jezebel, and on CBS This Morning, HuffPost LIVE and NPR’s Morning Edition. Pam is the creator of Phantasmaphile, a blog on art and culture with an esoteric or fantastical bent. More about Pam at www.pamgrossman.com

Moderator:

Since coming to Drexel in 1987, Alexander Friedlander has taught a wide range of writing and communication courses including Document Design, Readings and Research in Communication, Research Methods, and courses in professional writing, freshman writing, and more.  He has also held administrative positions in the department, including Graduate Program Director (1992-1997), Undergraduate Communication Program Coordinator (1997-2001, 2004-2007), and Assistant Head of Culture and Communication (2002-2007).



Friday, May 16th

Slam Bam Thank You Ma’am!

Painted Bride Quarterly’s own interactive writing competition!

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Come check out the game where the audience makes all the decisions!

Think of the silliness of “Whose Line is it Anyway?” and the drama of Henry Rollins, then think again…

The audience calls out writing prompts and then the audience writes in response. Volunteers share, the audience makes noise, and the winner gets to reach into our swag bag for a surprise.

We’re not sure we explained it well enough—you better just come see for yourself.

Co-op and Internship Opportunities for Drexel English & Philosophy Majors

1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Drexel offers unique prospects for Drexel English and Philosophy Majors to practice their skills in the workplace.  This panel features representatives from four very different places seeking motivated Drexel students.

Panel Participants:

Sharlene Goldfischer is the program coordinator at Musehouse, a non-profit center for the literary arts in Chestnut Hill.  In this position, she is responsible for program development, catalog production, assisting with fundraising and many other day-to-day operational tasks, interfacing with instructors and students in many capacities.  Sharlene has a B.A. in Psychology from Beaver College (now Arcadia University), an M.Ed. in Special Education from Temple University and a certificate in non-profit executive leadership from Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work.

Lillian Dunn is the Executive Editor of Apiary, an all-volunteer literary organization dedicated to nurturing and celebrating the literary arts in Philadelphia, and fostering cross cultural understanding among Philadelphians through literary expression and collaboration.

Kathleen Volk Miller is co-director of Drexel Publishing Group, which offer both  internships for academic credit and co-op positions. Interns participate in the tasks that go into the overall operation of the DPG: assist in the content management of its several publications; reads, evaluates and edits submissions; and other tasks. Co-op positions include acting as the managing editor or being the desktop editor for DPG Online, PBQ, and The 33rd.

Henry Israeli is the editor of Saturnalia Books, Philadelphia’s only independent publisher of contemporary poetry. He is also a published poet, a professor at Drexel, and Associate Director of Drexel’s Certificate in Writing & Publishing.

Maya Reading

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location: Drexel Bookstore

Celebrate another year of promoting literacy and creativity with Maya’s 2013 book release party. There will be an open mic, light refreshments and prize giveaways.

 

English Department Awards Ceremony

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Location: PISB 106 and the Atrium

This ceremony features the 31st Annual Freshman Writing Awards, the Literature Essay Prize, the Week of Writing (WoW) Awards, and the Sigma Tau Delta Inductions. The awards are sponsored by the Erika Guenther and Gertrud Daemmrich Memorial Prizes, The Department of English & Philosophy, and the College of Arts & Sciences. Refreshments will be served.