A publication of the Department of English & Philosophy at Drexel University

2012 Week of Writing Schedule

To see the 2012 Week of Writing Contest page, click here.


Overview | Location | Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday


Overview

University City Main Campus Map

Monday, May 21st

Marathon Reading

11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Philosophy as/and Literature

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Graphic Writing Workshop

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

Drexel Writing Center, MacAlister Hall, Basement Level


Tuesday, May 22nd

Marathon Reading

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Writing for Social Change

1:00 pm – 2:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Crime Writing

2:30 pm – 3:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Maya Open Mic

3:50 pm – 4:30 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Inventing the Page: Writing Challenge

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

W. W. Hagerty’s Bookmark Café

Generating the Poetry of Change Workshop

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Drexel Writing Center, MacAlister Building Basement Level

 


Wednesday, May 23rd

The Philadelphia Writing Scene

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Creese Student Center Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

How to Create the Next Great _______

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Creese Student Center Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Literary Death Match

8:15 pm

World Cafe Live, 31st and Walnut


Thursday, May 24th

Performing Memoir

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Social Media and the Representation of the Self

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

The Intoxicating Allure of Drinks Writing

3:30 pm – 4:50 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Meet the Editors @ Landmark

5:00 pm-7:00 pm

Landmark Americana, 34th and Market

Twiction: Generating and Publishing Tweet-length Fiction, Workshop

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Drexel Writing Center, MacAlister Building Basement Level


Friday, May 25th

Slam Bam Thank You Ma’am!

12:00 pm – 1:20 pm

Creese Student Center Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

English Department Award Ceremony

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Paul Peck Alumni Center, 32 and Market


MORE DETAILS COMING! STAY TUNED!


Location

All Week of Writing events will take place in the Creese Student Center, accessible via Chestnut Street entrances. Please check the individual events for details on which part of the Creese Student Center those events will take place within.

Campus Map


Monday, May 21st

Marathon Reading

11:00 am – 2:00 pm

Mandell Lobby

Student winners from the WoW contest, as well as faculty members deliver short readings of their own work.

Philosophy as/and Literature

How are Literature and Philosophy related? As modes of writing and discourse they seem to be related somehow. Is Philosophy just a genre of Literature someplace between “fiction” and “true crime”? Or is what we normally call “Literature” better understood as a specific and mostly subjective mode of philosophical activity? If Philosophy is the pursuit of truth, then doesn’t Literature deserve to be considered just the most constant and pervasive means through which humans have pursued Philosophy over the history of the species? Or are Philosophy and Literature mostly different and disconnected from one another? What makes some texts “Philosophical” and others “Literary”? How is their different content to be distinguished? Does our pursuit of one undermine our appreciation of the other? Our panel will shed some light on some of these broader issues at the intersection of Philosophy and Literature by discussing in concrete ways how works of literature have informed their teaching and philosophical research on topics like trust and betrayal, the nature of personal identity, the ways language shapes perception, the nature and development of critical thinking skills, the interconnections between the humanities and the sciences, and their relationships to professional work in fields like medicine and academic advising.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Mandell Lobby

Moderator:

Peter Amato, director of programs in Philosophy, is interested in the ethical and philosophical dimensions of Karl Marx’s critique of capitalist society, in particular as illuminated by Hans-Georg Gadamer’s Philosophical Hermeneutics.

Panelists:

Peter L. Hagen is Director of the Center for Academic Advising at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.  He was the founding Chair of the National Academic Advising Association’s Theory and Philosophy of Academic Advising Commission and currently serves on that organization’s Publications Review Board. He served as the lead editor of Scholarly Inquiry in Academic Advising, published by NACADA in 2010.

Dr. Rodger Jackson is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.  His specializes in ethical theory and applied ethics.  He is the author of a number of articles including, ““The Sense and Sensibility of Betrayal: Discovering the Meaning of Betrayal Through Jane Austen”, “Resolving Bertrand’s Probability Paradox” “Academic Advising and Philosophy” “The Ethics of Student Faculty Friendships” “Physician, Strikes, and Trust”,  and “Race and Treating Other People’s Children as Adults.”

Melanie McLeod, M.A., R.N. Ms. McLeod obtained her Masters in Philosophy from Michigan State University.  She has taught a variety of topics over the past twenty years including symbolic logic, critical thinking, introduction to ethics, philosophy of science, and medical ethics.  She is the co-author of the book, Foundations of Logic: An Introduction to Symbolic Logic. Currently she teaches both Critical Thinking and Symbolic Logic for the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

Graphic Writing Workshop

4:30 pm  - 6:00 pm

Drexel Writing Center, MacAlister Hall, Basement Level


Tuesday, May 22nd

Marathon Reading

11:00 am – 1:00 pm

Mandell Lobby

Writing for Social Change

Writing has long been a tool for constructing civic agency, for communicating social critique, and for creating communities that inspire and sustain social transformation. This panel will discuss the critical role that writers can play in making an impact on the social climate, and how some of today’s contemporary writers are using writing creatively and courageously in civic discourse.

1:00 pm – 2:20 pm

Mandell Lobby

Moderator: Rebecca Ingalls

Panelists:

Greg Corbin: is an award-winning international poet, motivational speaker, activist, teacher, and Founder/Executive Director of the award winning Philadelphia Youth Poetry Movement. He has been featured at schools, conferences, festivals, and venues across the country, including #140Edu and the City of Philadelphia’s “Unlitter Us” campaign. He is also an accomplished artist who has performed from South Carolina to South African, sharing stages with the likes of India Arie, Mos Def, Talib Kweli, Saul Williams, Sonia Sanchez and many other powerful artists of today’s movement. Corbin is a recipient of the 2011 Focus on Prevention Awards from Drexel University’s Center for Prevention of School-Aged Violence, and one of 76 Creative Connectors in Philadelphia. He has discussed youth advocacy and empowerment along with the power peer mentorship on TED talks. He has also been featured on HBO, CNN, CSPAN, BET and other networks.

Barbara Laker:  A native of Kent, England, Barbara Laker, 54, came to the United States with her family when she was 12. In high school, as Watergate broke, Barbara knew she wanted to be a reporter. She graduated from the University of Missouri Journalism School in 1979. A reporter for more than 30 years, Barbara has worked for the Clearwater Sun, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Dallas Times-Herald and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, before joining the Philadelphia Daily News in 1993. She has written about everything from murder and corruption to AIDS and child abuse. At the Daily News , she has been a general assignment reporter, assistant city editor and investigative reporter. With Daily News colleague Wendy Ruderman, she won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism for their series, “Tainted Justice,” about a rogue narcotics squad in the Philadelphia Police Department.

Tara Murtha: Senior writer and a columnist at Philadelphia Weekly, where she focuses on long-form features on news, crime, policy, courts, social justice issues, with a particular interest in urban violence, reproductive policy, human trafficking, animal welfare and Weird Philadelphia. Last year, she was recognized by the Philadelphia Newspaper Association with their Distinguished Writer Award, given to one alt-weekly writer in the state each year.

Tim Whitaker: is the executive director of Mighty Writers, a nonprofit that teaches writing to city kids in Philadelphia. He began his career teaching fifth and sixth grade at Gesu School in North Philadelphia before becoming a writer and editor. He was the editor of Philadelphia Weekly (1994—2008), and previously the editor of Gulfshore Life, PhillySport and Pittsburgh magazines. Whitaker was also a writer at NBC Radio and has written for numerous publications, including the New York Times, Washington Post and Philadelphia Inquirer. He has written documentaries for PBS and is the author of “Crash: The Life and Times of Dick Allen.”

Wendy Ruderman: began her career at a weekly newspaper in South Jersey. Then she joined the publicity staff at WHYY TV12 and 91FM, the PBS and NPR affiliates in Philadelphia. In 1997, she earned her master’s from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She then joined the State House bureau of the Trenton Times. She worked on “press row” in New Jersey’s capitol building, where State House security guards occasionally mistook the 4’11,’’ 85-pound Ruderman as a sixth grader on a class trip. From 1997-2002, Ruderman covered both administrations of governors Christie Todd Whitman and James E. McGreevey for the Trenton Times, the Associated Press and the Bergen Record. She joined the Philadelphia Inquirer as a staff writer in December 2002. In 2007, she jumped to the Philadelphia Daily News.  Ruderman loves to write about people – the dogooders, badasses and whackadoos. She views her reporting job as a privilege, a ringside seat to life’s sad, funny and sometimes scary circus.

Ruderman, along with Daily News colleague Barbara Laker, won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting for their “Tainted Justice” series, which focused on allegations of police corruption.

Crime Writing

2:30 pm – 3:50 pm

Mandell Lobby

Moderator: Eva Thury

Panelists:

Albert DiBartolomeo:  is the author of the novels The Vespers Tapes and Fool’s Gold. He teaches at Drexel University.

Michael Capuzzo: is an American journalist and author best known for his New York Times-bestselling nonfiction books, The Murder Room and Close to Shore.“The Murder Room,” the true story of a private dining club of famous detectives who solve cold murders, and “Close to Shore,” an historic thriller and recreation of the first American shark attack in Edwardian New Jersey, both enjoyed wide acclaim from critics and authors such as Gay Talese, Mark Bowden, John Sanford, and Michael Connelly. The Murder Room, published in a number of countries, was one of five finalists for The Golden Dagger Award for Non-Fiction given by the British Crime Writer’s Association for the best true-crime book by any writer of any nationality published in England in 2010/2011, and was nominated by Gotham/Penguin Books for the Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction.

Steve Volk:  has been writing about crime for newspapers and magazines, including Philadelphia Weekly, Philadelphia Magazine, Vibe, and Rolling Stone for 15 years. A narrative writer, Volk has covered Philadelphia’s drug trade extensively, going to what are, essentially, Philadelphia’s war torn corners to report on life as its lived in the city’s more violent neighborhoods.

Maya Open Mic

3:50 pm – 4:30 pm

Mandell Lobby, 33rd and Chestnut

Inventing the Page: Writing Challenge

4:30 pm – 6:00 pm

W. W. Hagerty’s Bookmark Café

Sharpen your pencils and gather your favorite writing utensils to celebrate the Week of Writing at the Drexel University Libraries’ Writing Challenge event! Attendees will compete in a two-round writing challenge to compose the best six-word story. Prizes will be awarded to the top three writers, selected by a panel of judges including Drexel students, staff and alumni. Refreshments will be provided. While you’re at Hagerty, be sure to check out our new exhibition, Inventing the Page: Student Literary Magazines at Drexel, on display until June 11th.

 Generating the Poetry of Change Workshop

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Drexel Writing Center, MacAlister Building Basement Level



Wednesday, May 23rd

The Philadelphia Writing Scene

Yes, Virginia, your writing life can and should continue after you graduate.   Meet some of Philadelphia’s literary movers and shakers and learn about where you can go to expand the left side of your brain.

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Creese Student Center Lobby

Moderator: Valerie Fox teaches at Drexel University. Her latest book of poems is The Glass Book (Texture Press). She is a founding coeditor of Press 1, an online magazine that features literary works, art, and opinion.

Panelists:

Carla  J. Spataro:  Fiction editor and co-publisher of Philadelphia Stories magazine and PS Books. She is a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowship winner. Her short stories can be read or are forthcoming in a number of literary journals including Wild River Review, XConnect, 322 Review, The Baltimore Review, Mason’s Road, and 4’ 33” (an online audio journal based in London). Nominated for a Million Writer’s South Award, she also was twice named a finalist in the Philadelphia City Paper Fiction contest, and was recently named a finalist in the Mason’s Road contest. She earned an MFA in creative writing from Rosemont College and currently teaches English and creative writing courses at Rosemont College, Rutgers Universtiy, Rowan University, and the Community College of Philadelphia.

Christian TeBordo: Has published four books, most recently The Awful Possibilities, a collection of short fiction, which received a starred review from Publishers Weekly and was nominated by Booklist as an American Library Association Notable Book of the Year. He has received a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts grant and was a finalist for a Pew Fellowship in the Arts. His next novel, The Apology, will be published in Spring of 2013. He lives in Philadelphia and, with Sarah Rose Etter, curates the TireFire Reading Series.

Leonard Gontarek:  Author of four books of poems:  St. Genevieve Watching Over Paris, Van Morrison Can’t Find His Feet,  Zen For Beginners and Déjà Vu Diner.  His poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Field, Poet Lore, Verse, Hanging Loose, Poetry Northwest, and in the anthologies, The Best American Poetry, The Working Poet and Joyful Noise: American Spiritual Poetr e conducts poetry workshops at the Moonstone Art Center, the Kelly Writers House and MuseHouse.    He has been a PEW fellowship finalist twice, has received five Pushcart Prize nominations,  and twice received poetry fellowships from the Pennsylvania Council On The Arts.  He was the 2011 Philadelphia Literary Death Match Champion.  Leonard coordinates the Green Line Café reading and interview series and has hosted The Monday Night Poets series at The Philadelphia Central Library for the past three years.   www.leafscape.org/LeonardGontarek

Lillian Dunn:  is a founding editor of APIARY Magazine, one of many Philly literary projects highlighting how great it is to be a writer in our city. She studied English at Swarthmore College and daylights at the Chemical Heritage Foundation as an assistant editor.

How to Create the Next Great ______ 

Interested in starting your own literary magazine, reading series, arts collective, and other artsty fartsy propositions?    Meet people who have done exactly that, against all odds and logic!

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Creese Student Center Lobby

Moderator: Kathleen Volk Miller: Co-editor of Painted Bride Quarterly, co-director of the Drexel Publishing Group, and Associate Teaching Professor at Drexel University. She is a weekly blogger (Thursdays) for Philadelphia Magazine’s Philly Post. Volk Miller writes fiction and essays, with work in publications such as Salon.comOpiumthesmartset.org, the New York Times Motherlode and with upcoming work in Drunken Boat. She is currently working on My Gratitude, a collection of essays. Recently, Kathleen Volk Miller was named a Creative Connector by Leadership Philadelphia. Follow her on Twitter @kvm1303.

Panelists:

Kathy Sheeder Bonanno:  Director of Musehouse: A Center for the Literary Arts, founded the organization in 2011 after being awarded a Knight Foundation Challenge Grant. Musehouse provides a home for writers of varying ages and levels of experience in poetry, fiction and non-fiction, through workshops, conferences and readings. Bonanno’s book, Slamming Open the Door, was among the ten best-selling books of poetry in America in 2009. She has been twice nominated for Pushcart Prizes for her poetry. An educator for eighteen years, in 2008, Bonanno was awarded a Woman of Courage/Woman of Inspiration Award by Lutheran Settlement House for her anti-violence advocacy.

Lillian Dunn:  is a founding editor of APIARY Magazine, one of many Philly literary projects highlighting how great it is to be a writer in our city. She studied English at Swarthmore College and daylights at the Chemical Heritage Foundation as an assistant editor.

Todd Zuniga:  a LA Times “Face to Watch” for 2012, is the creator of Literary Death Match, now featured in 42 cities worldwide, the founding editor of Opium Magazine, and the president of Opium for the Arts (a 501©3 nonprofit). His fiction has recently appeared in Stymie and Gopher Illustrated, and online at Lost Magazine and McSweeney’s. Based between Los Angeles and couches all over Europe, he longs for a Chicago Cubs World Series and an EU passport.

Literary Death Match

PBQ produces its third Literary Death Match throwing four top-notch writers into the ring before a lively audience and three all-star judges. After each pair of readings, the judges spout commentary and select their favorite writers to advance to the finals.

The authors include American Poetry Review editor Elizabeth Scanlon, Barrelhouse Review co-founder Mike Ingram, Stories V! author Scott McClanahan, and Apirary Magazine editor Ras Mashramani. Judging the Death Match are Philadelphia Weekly’s Tara Murtha,Philadelphia Inquirer book editor John Timpane, and acclaimed visual artist Zoe Strauss. Painted Bride Quarterly is holding the event at World Cafe live, 8:15PM on May 23. Tickets are $7 or $10 at the door. Our LDM’s always sell out so get them before they’re gone.


Thursday, May 24th

Performing Memoir

At least as far back as Mark Twain, performers have told the stories of their lives in front of appreciative audiences.  This panel, which includes artists from a variety of disciplines including theater, dance, spoken word, mixed media, film, and poetry, will discuss their autobiographical performances.  The panel will consider how such performances are composed, ethical issues involved in the presentation of self and others, and the practical issues of finding an audience.

12:30 pm – 1:50 pm

Mandell Lobby

Moderator: Gail Rosen teaches the three course sequence in the Freshman English Writing Program. She’s also created the curriculum for Law and Literature in which students explore literary works with legal themes.

Panelists:

Fred Siegel teaches English at Drexel University.  In his life outside, he is a member of the improv group “Tongue and Groove” and the performing ensemble “Fred’s Magic World.”  His memoir performance “Man of Mystery” appeared in the 2010 Philadelphia Fringe Festival.

Bonnie MacAllister:  Renders moments through a variety of media. Often pieces are multi-genre, fusing painting, photography, slide installations, spoken word, video, and performance.  She is a Pushcart Prize nominee, a five-time poetry slam champion in the United States and France, and Fulbright-Hays awardee to Ethiopia. Bonnie has performed and read her original writing in such venues as New York Foundation for the Arts, the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, Raandesk Gallery, Highwire Gallery, Shubin Theatre, Wilma Theater, Adrienne Theater, October Gallery, and Paris’ Cat Cat Club. She recently screened her original films in Los Angeles and New York, and she exhibits internationally and in UN sponsored exhibits. Many of her films and audio pieces have been released on the Classwar Karaoke label (UK).

Eric Thomas:  hailed as “one of the most talented storytellers in Philly” by the Philadelphia Weekly, is a playwright, stand-up dramedian and teaching artist.  His solo show, Will You Accept This Friend Request? premiered to a sold out run in November 2011 as part of the First Person Festival.  Overexposed, a three-person storytelling show Eric co-created with Daniel Student and Jennifer Macmillan was produced by Quince Productions in February 2012.

Eric has also read or performed work throughout the country and was honored to give a talk at the TEDxPhilly conference in 2011.  He is a frequent host and performer at First Person Arts Story Slams, at which he is a 6-time winner.  He has designed seminars for Temple University, the White Williams Scholars program and the William Way Community Center; he currently offers classes on storytelling, branding and performance . REricThomas.com

Jamie J. Brunson:  has brought storytelling to the stage within different spheres of the arts and cultural community for over 16 years. She is the Executive Director of First Person Arts and an accomplished playwright, Brunson is a four-time Delaware Division of the Arts/NEA grantee for playwriting and an award-winning playwright who was named a “New Voice in American Theatre” by the Edward Albee Theatre Conference. Her plays have been produced across the country at the Wilmington Fringe Festival (DE); the Kitchen Theatre; New Freedom Theatre; the Harlem Theatre Company, Abingdon Theatre (NYC); Walnut Street Theatre Second Stage (Philadelphia); Karamu House (Cleveland, OH); and Providence Black Repertory Company (RI). Her playwriting awards and honors include a Panelist Choice Award at the Edward Albee Conference and selection as a Chesterfield Film Company Fellowship Semi-Finalist.

Social Media and Representation of the Self

A panel on issues of gender, self-construction, and social media use. Do we define social media or do they define us? Academic scholars and social media developers/practitioners discuss how writing and innovative uses of technology and social media encourage creativity and self-knowledge.   Questions and discussion follow.

2:00 pm – 3:20 pm

Mandell Lobby

Moderator:   Deirdre McMahon is a member of Drexel’s English and Philosophy faculty, who teaches courses in writing, British literature, and Young Adult Fiction.

Panelists:

Denise Agosto:  is an associate professor in the College of Information Science & Technology at Drexel University.  Her research and teaching interests include youths’ social media practices, children’s and teens’ digital information practices, and public library services.  She has published nearly 100 articles, book chapters, other scholarly publications in these areas, and she has completed several related funded research projects.  Dr. Agosto is the winner of numerous research and teaching awards, including the 2011 ALISE Award for Teaching Excellence in the Field of Library and Information Science Education, the 2007 Christian R. & Mary F. Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award, and the Drexel University 2007 Outstanding Contribution to Online Learning Award.  Her most recent book is Teens, Libraries, and Social Networking: What Librarians Need to Know.  (with June Abbas, Ph.D., Libraries Unlimited, 2011.)

Kate Engelbrecht: produced the photography driven The Girl Project and subsequent book Please Read (If At All Possible).  Through this work she has become an advocate for reevaluating the ways in which we view and speak to young women.  She is a champion of teenage girls and their quest to be seen and heard as they are rather than as the media portrays them.

Nicole Kline: Senior Editor at Warp Zoned, one of the Editors-in-Chief at Press 1, the Senior Editor at Games in Philly, a contributing writer at Geekadelphia, and the co-founder of Girl Geek Dinners Philadelphia. She’s also currently enrolled in the Library Sciences graduate program at Drexel University, where she works full time as a secretary in the English and Philosophy Department. Her primary hobbies are writing, video gaming, reading, and playing skeeball, and her secondary hobbies include knitting, snowboarding, playing tabletop and board games, and watching television shows on Netflix.

Tracey Welson-Rossman: is a founding member of, and Chief Marketing Officer for, Chariot Solutions, a Philadelphia-based customer software and mobile application development firm. Tracey is also the founder and current chair of the Emerging Technologies for the Enterprise Conference, (ETE), Tracey is one of the founding board members of Philadelphia Startup Leaders; a regional organization dedicated to growing technology startup businesses. She founded a non-profit called TechGirlz, to help more girls embrace technology.  She graduated from Drexel University with a B.S. degree in Business Administration, with Retail Management/Marketing as her field of concentration. She is married and the proud mom of two teenage boys.

The Intoxicating Allure of Drinks Writing

Writing about wine, spirits, and beer is a firmly established, though specialized, genre of journalism. With the growing interest and popularity of fine beverages, this drinks writing has suddenly become a trendy, burgeoning field. The image of the wine critic, imperiously sniffing, sipping, and spitting has long been a staple in our popular culture. But today’s drinks writers are breaking the old stereotypes, and exploring wine, spirits, and beer as a window into culture and society.

3:30 pm – 4:50 pm

Mandell Lobby

Panelists:

David Wondrich:  “A living iPod of drink lore and recipes” (the New York Times), or, if you prefer, a “crazy, bearded Civil War general” (Conan O’Brien), David Wondrich is the world’s foremost expert on the history of the American cocktail. Plus, Stephen Colbert thinks he’s cute. As Esquire magazine’s long-time Drinks Correspondent, Wondrich has ranged far and wide through the world of booze. He also writes for Saveur and The Malt Advocate, and has contributed to a host of other publications, from Gourmet, Bon Appetit and Wine & Spirits to Oprah, Real Simple, Martha Stewart’s Blueprint, Marie Claire and too many others to count. He has written one book on the evolution of American music and three books on cocktails and mixology, including his classic, Imbibe! From Absinthe Cocktail to Whiskey Smash, a Salute in Stories and Drinks to Professor Jerry Thomas, Pioneer of the American Bar.

Lew Bryson:  A former librarian who has been making a living writing about drinks since 1995. He is considered to be one of America’s foremost beer and whiskey critics. Bryson is the managing editor of Whisky Advocate, and writes regularly for journals like Cheers, All About Beer, New Brewer, and Beverage Business. He has also written for The Philadelphia Inquirer, The Chicago Tribune and Condé Nast Portfolio. He has authored a series of regional brewery guides that include Pennsylvania Breweries, New York Breweries, and New Jersey Breweries, has served as a judge on the Professional Blind Tasting Panel at the Great American Beer Festival, and was one of the originators of the highly successful Philly Beer Week. He grew up in Lancaster, PA and still lives in the Philadelphia area. His blog, “Seen Through A Glass,” can be found at lewbryson.blogspot.com

Jason Wilson:  The drinks columnist for the Washington Post and dining columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. His Post column has twice won an award for Best Newspaper Food Column from the Association of Food Journalists. His first book, Boozehound: On The Trail of the Rare, the Obscure, and the Overrated in Spirits was called “superbly informative, entertaining, and yet deeply subversive” by Anthony Bourdain. Wilson is also the series editor of The Best American Travel Writing anthology and founding editor of The Smart Set and Table Matters websites, both at Drexel University. His work has appeared in many publications, including National Geographic Traveler, Travel + Leisure, the Boston Globe, and Salon, and he was previously the restaurant critic at Philadelphia Magazine. He teaches writing in the Pennoni Honors College and is the director of the Center for Cultural Outreach.

Amy Zavatto: A contributing editor to Imbibe magazine, she also writes about wine, spirits, and food for Foxnews.comEvery Day With Rachael Ray, Edible Manhattan, and many others. Author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Bartending, The Hedonist Guide to Eat NY,and co-author of The Renaissance Guide to Wine & Food Pairing, Amy holds an Advanced Certificate in Wines & Spirits from the WSET in London. She’s given talks on wine and food pairing around the country, and has toured distilleries everywhere from Kentucky to Jalisco to the Highlands of Scotland. She lives, eats, and drinks in New York City.

Meet the Editors at Landmark

Painted Bride Quarterly and The Smart Set would like to invite faculty and students to meet the editors of our many and varied publications at Drexel, such as: ASK; Drexel Publishing Group Online magazine; Journal of the African Literature Association (JALA); Journal of Modern Literature; Per Contra; Press One; Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature; Saturnalia Books; the Sonia Sanchez Literary Review; When Falls the Coliseum, and others.
Please join us for cocktails and conversation at the new Landmark Americana. Cocktail buffet; Sangria, beer and wine served to those over 21.

5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Landmark Americana, 34th and Market Streets

Twiction: Generating and Publishing Tweet-length Fiction, Workshop

7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Drexel Writing Center, MacAlister Building Basement Level



Friday, May 25th

Slam Bam Thank You Ma’am!

Who knew writing could be competitive?  Join in PBQ’s own brand of interactive, audience driven fun, complete with prizes.

12:00 pm – 1:20 pm

Creese Student Center

English Department Awards Ceremony

3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Paul Peck Alumni Center, 32 and Market

This ceremony features the 30th Annual Freshman Writing Awards, the Literature Essay Prize, the Week of Writing (WoW) Awards, and the Sigma Tau Delta Inductions. The awards are sponsored by the Erika Guenther and Gertrud Daemmrich Memorial Prizes, The Department of English and Philosophy, and the College of Arts and Sciences. Refreshments will be served.